3 new Utah beers for fall

By Kathy Stephenson The Salt Lake Tribune

Published September 18th 2014 9:00 am



As the season change, so do the beers we drink.

The light, thirst-quenching beers we enjoyed in summer give way to darker, rich brews that warm us in fall.

Utah brewers are ready for this seasonal change and are offering their fall releases. Some brewers have brought back favorites from past years, but here are three new beers to the market that are worth a try. All the beers are available in state liquor stores or their respective pubs and breweries.

25th Annibrewsary Barley Wine Ale • In honor of Squatters' 25th anniversary, the brewery produced this English-style barley wine ale, which has a deep ruby color and a sweet malty aroma. The heavy dry fruit flavor of the beer pairs well with strong cheeses, lamb and other heavy meat dishes and rich desserts, said brewmaster Jason Stock. The beer also is a good one to set aside for aging. "I recommend that our guests buy a few bottles to drink right now while the beer is relatively young," said Stock, "and if you can resist temptation, put some away for a year or more to enjoy on a special occasion."

Bohemian Alt • Since its founding in 2001, Bohemian Brewery has produced beers that are 4 percent alcohol by volume (ABV) or 3.2 by weight. But earlier this year, the Midvale brewery launched two high-point beers, including this D?sseldorf-style Altbier. The hoppy brown ale, which has been aged like a lager, is 5.3 percent ABV. Marketing director Will Gillane said it's a good pick for fall as "it's a little dark and has a warm, toasty feeling."

Fr?hlich Pils • Red Rock Brewing Company makes this new beer -- which translates to "Happy Pils" -- with pilsner malts, German noble hops and lager yeast. It has a "floral and hoppy nose, a distinct hop bitterness and a lingering dry finish," said marketing director Michael Druce. Red Rock initially planned to name the beer "Prescription Pils" -- a nod to the Prohibition-era when doctors were being allowed to write prescriptions for alcohol for "medicinal purposes." The Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, however, rejected the label, saying it implied the beer offered a health benefit. Instead, Red Rock chose a German name that pokes fun at Utah's high prescription rate of Prozac and other anti-depressants, often called happy pills.

kathys@sltrib.com

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As the season change, so do the beers we drink.

The light, thirst-quenching beers we enjoyed in summer give way to darker, rich brews that warm us in fall.

Utah brewers are ready for this seasonal change and are offering their fall releases. Some brewers have brought back favorites from past years, but here are three new beers to the market that are worth a try. All the beers are available in state liquor stores or their respective pubs and breweries.

25th Annibrewsary Barley Wine Ale • In honor of Squatters' 25th anniversary, the brewery produced this English-style barley wine ale, which has a deep ruby color and a sweet malty aroma. The heavy dry fruit flavor of the beer pairs well with strong cheeses, lamb and other heavy meat dishes and rich desserts, said brewmaster Jason Stock. The beer also is a good one to set aside for aging. "I recommend that our guests buy a few bottles to drink right now while the beer is relatively young," said Stock, "and if you can resist temptation, put some away for a year or more to enjoy on a special occasion."

Bohemian Alt • Since its founding in 2001, Bohemian Brewery has produced beers that are 4 percent alcohol by volume (ABV) or 3.2 by weight. But earlier this year, the Midvale brewery launched two high-point beers, including this D?sseldorf-style Altbier. The hoppy brown ale, which has been aged like a lager, is 5.3 percent ABV. Marketing director Will Gillane said it's a good pick for fall as "it's a little dark and has a warm, toasty feeling."

Fr?hlich Pils • Red Rock Brewing Company makes this new beer -- which translates to "Happy Pils" -- with pilsner malts, German noble hops and lager yeast. It has a "floral and hoppy nose, a distinct hop bitterness and a lingering dry finish," said marketing director Michael Druce. Red Rock initially planned to name the beer "Prescription Pils" -- a nod to the Prohibition-era when doctors were being allowed to write prescriptions for alcohol for "medicinal purposes." The Alcohol Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, however, rejected the label, saying it implied the beer offered a health benefit. Instead, Red Rock chose a German name that pokes fun at Utah's high prescription rate of Prozac and other anti-depressants, often called happy pills.

kathys@sltrib.com

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